Legacy

In 1970, after utilizing the abandoned Ford Building (Aerospace Museum), community members and artists began attending City council meetings to acquire the site as a center for art and culture. The community was awarded an abandoned water tank in Balboa Park that came to be the Centro Cultural de La Raza.

The Centro has been a sacred space instrumental in Chican@, Latin@, and Indigenous art and culture. Some of today’s most influential artists grew through the Centro: Los Lobos, Culture Clash, Lalo Alcaraz.

Published Works 

The Centro has published exhibition catalogues, poetry series and children’s books. It is also referenced in a number of publications such as Made in Aztlan: Centro Cultural de la Raza, Fifteenth Anniversary, among others. The list below is a sample:

  • Maize poetry series
  • Tula y Tonan children’s book series
  • The Border Art Workshop, 1984-1989 Exhibition Catalogue
  • The Broken Line/La Linea Quebrada
  • La Frontera/The Border, Art About the Mexico/United States Border Experience
  • Fragmentos de Barro
  • Separate but Assimilated: Latino Immigrant Communities and their Museums
  • Rebozos of Love
  • Nationchild Plumaroja
  • “Immigrants in Our Own Land”: A Chicano Literature Review and Pedagogical ASSESSMENT
  • The Bronze Screen
  • Postborder City: Cultural Spaces of Bajalta California
  • Negotiating Performance
  • Globalization on the Line: Culture, Capital and Citizenship at US Borders
  • A Companion to CulturalSTUDIES
  • The Fence and the River: Culture and Politics at the U.S.-Mexico Border
  • Poor Dancer’s Almanac
  • Race and Politics: Asian Americans, Latinos, and Whites in a Los Angeles Suburb
  • Mexicanos: A History of Mexicans in the United States
  • The Ethnic Eye: Latino Media Arts
  • Chicano Art Inside/Outside the Master’s House: Cultural Politics and the Cara Exhibition
  • Rethinking Borders
  • The Expediency of Culture: Uses of Culture in the Global Era
  • Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural Diversity in ContemporaryAMERICA
  • Under the Fifth Sun: Latino Literature from California
  • Anglos and Mexicans in the Making of Texas, 1836-1986
  • More Adventures with Kids in San Diego
  • Dimensions of theAMERICAS : Art and Social Change in Latin America and the United States
  • Lonely Planet Coastal California
  • Chicano Drama: Performance, Society and Myth
  • The Latino Holiday Book: From Cinco de Mayo to Dia de Los Muertos: The Celebrations and Traditions
  • Calling California Home, A Lively Look at What It Means to Be a Californian
  • With Other Eyes: Looking at Race and Gender in Visual Culture
  • From Totems to Hip-Hop: Poetry Across the Americas, 1900-2002
  • Lowrider
  • De Paseo: Curso Intermedio de Español
  • Feminist Rhetorical Theories
  • LOCAL Motion: The Travels of Chicana and Latina Popular Culture
  • Barrio-Logos: Space and Place in Urban Chicano Literature and Culture
  • Urban Exile: Collected Writings of Harry Gambia Jr.
  • Breaking Boundaries: Latina Writing and Critical Readings
  • Race-Ingo Art History: Critical Readings in Race and Art History
  • A Hispanic View: American Politics and the Politics of Immigration
  • Women Making Art: History, Subjectivity, Aesthetics
  • CONTESTED Terrain: Diversity, Writing, and Knowledge
  • Radical Media: Rebellious Communication and Social Movements
  • San Diego: California’s Cornerstone
  • Contemporary Trends in Landscape Architecture
  • Border Writing: The Multidimensional Text
  • Celluloid Nationalism and Other Melodramas: From Post-Revolutionary Mexico to Fin De Silo
  • MidAmerican
  • O Solo Homo: The New Queer Performance
  • Chicana Feminisms: A Critical Reader
  • Reading California: Art, Image, and Identity, 1900-2000
  • Space, Site, Intervention: SituatingINSTALLATION Art
  • Other Sisterhoods: Literary Theory and U.S. Women of Color
  • Shot inAMERICA : Television, the State, and the Rise of Chicano Cinema